RAISED $215  |  GOAL $1,000

0 OF 4 CHILDREN TREATED


#CAMPAIGNFORKIDS  BY

The Stony Brook University Biomedical Engineering Society

 

In third world countries, aside from the presence of a social stigma, being physically disabled also limits the ease of travel, as the primary transportation is walking. These children have compromised access to education, as without the proper medical procedures and funds, they are unable to rely on their legs to get them to school. We are hoping to raise enough money, approximately $1,000 to provide 4 children with prosthetic limbs. This year we will be raising funds by selling ‘A Leg To Stand On’ bracelets as well as hosting a BMES Talent Show in April.

 

 

“Being engineering students, we have sat through several lectures learning about the working principles behind medical advancements, such as prostheses. We learn how it works, we regurgitate the information on tests, and we work on design projects and problem sets with hypothetical scenarios – but what about seeing the impact it has on actual scenarios, on actual societies? A Leg To Stand On and the children being helped inspire us.”

- Shipra Arjun, Outreach Chair

ABOUT BMES:

The Stony Brook Chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society was established in 1997 with the initial intention to promote the biomedical engineering profession in both academia and industry, and to be one of the most valuable resources to our members.

BMES strives to provide a forum for social interaction and exchange of ideas between students, both graduate and undergraduate, and faculty in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Stony Brook University.

 

“We support ALTSO so we can put a human dimension to our studies combining biology and engineering”
— John Medamana, Treasurer

 

 

CAN'T MAKE AN EVENT?

MAKE A DONATION AND SPREAD THE WORD

A Leg To Stand On ("ALTSO") provides free prosthetic limbs, orthotic devices, mobility aids, corrective surgery and rehabilitative care to children in developing countries who have lost limbs in traumatic accidents or suffer from congenital limb disabilities. All patients are children under the age of 19 whose families cannot afford the care they need to live a self-sufficient life. Since 2003, ALTSO has treated more than 12,500 children in Asia, Africa and Latin America.


Interested in helping out?

SEND US A MESSAGE

Name *
Name