Program Partners

Our partners staff local prosthetic and orthotic professionals, certified physiotherapists, and support staff, all of whom are best positioned to understand the area, patient population, languages spoken, and identify which locally-available materials are best suited for the terrain, climate and comfort of the patient. Their extensive network allows us to identify some of the neediest children, many of whom live in remote areas and would otherwise go unnoticed – and suffer needlessly.


Afghanistan

 

Overview

Three decades of war and civil unrest have left Afghanistan’s healthcare infrastructure woefully inadequate to care for its population. Healthcare for women and children is among the worst in the world. By age five, 9.7% of children in Afghanistan die due to lack of care during birth and treatment for basic ailments thereafter. The consequences for disabled children in Afghanistan who do not have access to treatment are particularly harsh and too often life-threatening.

 

PARTNER

The Kabul Orthopedic Organization ("KOO") was originally started by the Sandy Gall Afghanistan Appeal (SGAA) in 1996 but was handed over to the Taliban in 1998 due to lack of funds. In 2004, KOO was re-established and registered as an Independent Non-Profit / Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Main office 13th street wazir akbar khan behind institute of health science - inside military hospital (Sardar Mohammad Dawood Khan Hospital) compound

URL: www.koo.coolpage.biz

EMAIL: maky.siawash@gmail.com

DIRECTOR: Gul Maky Siawash

 

KEY FACTS

  • On average, children from the poorest areas of Afghanistan have to walk 7 kilometers (or 3.35 miles) to the nearest secondary school. For children unable to access or afford the mobility aid they need to walk, school is physically unattainable.
  • 70% of disabled adults are unemployed in Afghanistan. For children with an untreated limb disability and no education, this is likely their fate, and a common result for many is street begging.
  • Due to social and religious beliefs in Afghanistan, disability is often seen as a punishment and when untreated, as a financial burden to the family, making disabled children particularly vulnerable to abuse and neglect.
  • In Afghanistan, adult female patients can only be treated by female medical professionals and vice-versa.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2012

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

1,998

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

3,732

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Bangladesh

 

OVERVIEW

The 8th most populous and one of the most densely populated countries in the world, it is no wonder Bangladesh is one of the so called ‘next eleven’ – poised to become one of the largest economies in the 21st century. But with poor health conditions directly attributed to the lack of healthcare related services provided by the government, most Bangladeshi’s struggle to afford care as the majority of citizens pay out-of-pocket.

 

PARTNER

The magnitude of disability in Bangladesh presents not only a major health problem, but it is also a prime cause of poverty and underdevelopment. Poverty, which first strikes the food security status at household level, creates havoc in the general health condition of the population. This is aggravated by a second factor resulting from the inadequate health service, especially in the rural areas of Bangladesh. To overcome this grim scenario, Impact Foundation Bangladesh (IFB) initiated preventive and curative health services in remote rural areas through its programs that include creating mass awareness about the causes of disability, the means for its easy prevention, curative services for the disabled and policy advocacy with regard to disability.

The Sir John Wilson Assistive Device Center (SJWADC), Chuadanga is a solely specialized institution in the Southwest region of Bangladesh for the management of physical disability and chronic pain. SJWADC manufactures various types of affordable orthotic and prosthetic devices. Assistive devices play an important role to ensure mobility of the physically disabled. Patients with cerebral palsy, limb amputation and post-operative clubfoot patients receive assistive devices from Sir John Wilson Assistive Device Centre.

SJWADC also has a physiotherapy unit where qualified physiotherapists are available to treat and assist patients. A large number of poor people are receiving physiotherapy and assistive device services at their doorstep through SJWADC.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: 1) Main Office: Impact Foundation Bangladesh Cosmopolitan Centre (3rd Floor) 22/2, Babor Road; Block B Mohammadpur, Dhaka 1207 2)Sir John Wilson Assistive Device Centre - Kedarganj, P.O & Dist. Chuadanga, Bangladesh 

URL: www.impactfoundationbd.org

EMAIL: impact@dhaka.net

DIRECTOR: Dr. Hasib Mahmud

 

KEY FACTS

  • Approximately half of all people with clubfoot are affected in both feet (aka, bilateral clubfoot). Clubfoot occurs in males twice as frequently as in females. Without treatment, people with clubfeet often appear to walk on their ankles or on the sides of their feet.
  • Neither genetic nor a ‘condition’, it is understood that the vast majority of cases are congenital, coming at or about the time of birth, and/or are diagnosed at a very young age rather than during adolescence or adulthood.
  • Treatment may include one or more of the following: physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, water therapy, medication, orthotic braces and other assistive devices.
  • In rural Bangladesh, females are less likely to seek treatment compared to males.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2008

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

2,770

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

4,740

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Cambodia

 

OVERVIEW

Suffering exponentially in the 20th century, Cambodia has seen more than it’s share of turmoil, despair and devastation. Three decades of war have taken a severe toll on the Cambodians, resulting in some 40,000 amputees – one of the highest rates in the world. With the rising number of victims, families are experiencing a considerable burden when trying to earn income and educate their children. When a member of a poor family in Cambodia loses a limb, it can drastically effect the entire households well-being.

 

PARTNER

Exceed Worldwide is recognized as a leader in the P&O field, its core work being the development and provision of prosthetic and orthotic services to disabled people in South East Asia and the training of local specialists to deliver these services.

Working in countries affected by conflict, disaster and poverty, Exceed offers rehabilitation services to disabled people where these are non-existent or inadequate. The organization works with local partners to build services from scratch, and train local staff as needed – aiming to hand over all of its projects to local management / government once there is enough local capacity.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: P.O.Box 122, #20C, Group 3, St. Doung Ngeap II, Stung Mean Chey, Khan Mean Chey, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

URL: www.exceed-worldwide.org

EMAIL: sisary@exceed-worldwide.org

DIRECTOR: Sisary Kheng

 

KEY FACTS

  • There are an estimated 600,000 disabled people in Cambodia – one fifth of these are children. One in every 300 Cambodians have one or more amputations.

  • A “regular” worker in Cambodia earns less than $2 a day. A prosthetic leg in the United States costs more than $10,000. This means that it would take a poor Cambodian family 5,000 days of income – or 50 years of work – to afford one prosthetic leg in the U.S.

  • 1 in 236 people are disabled in Cambodia, making it the most disabled country in the world, decreasing the average life expectancy to 52 years.

  • Our Program Partner in Cambodia is ISO and also ISPO certified, giving them international quality recognition and standardization.

 

PROGRAM FACTS

2011

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

831

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

3,198

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

India

 

OVERVIEW

Home to the largest democracy in the world, India is the second most populous country and 10th largest economy in the world. However, it continues to face the challenges of poverty, corruption, malnutrition, and an inadequate public healthcare system.

India is estimated to have a third of the world’s poor. It is reported that 32% of the total Indian population falls below the international poverty line of US$ 1.25 per day, while 96% live on less than US$ 5 per day.

 

PARTNER 1

Inaugurated in April 2002, the A Leg To Stand On-Ahmedabad Clinic ("ALTSO-A"), located at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, India – serves as ALTSO’s first program partner to provide free prosthetic devices and rehabilitation to children in Gujarat state. In coordination with Civil Hospital, ALTSO-A remains the sole provider of all prosthetic devices and laboratory outfitting for children.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Govt. Prosthetics & Orthotics College, Govt. Spine Institute, Ahmedabad - 380016

EMAIL: paraplegiahospital@vsnl.net

DIRECTOR: Dr. M. M. Prabhakar

PRINCIPLE: Dhiren Joshi

TEL: 079-22680471

 

PARTNER 2

The Amar Jyoti Research and Rehabilitation Center was established in 1981 in Delhi, under the aegis of Amar Jyoti Charitable Trust. Amar Jyoti is a voluntary organization rendering rehabilitative services to persons with disabilities through a holistic approach of inclusive education, medical care, vocational training, child guidance and self-employment.


CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Karkardooma, Vikas Marg, Delhi 110 092

URL: www.amarjyotirehab.org

EMAIL: amarjoti@del2.vsnl.net.in

DIRECTOR: Dr. Uma Tuli


KEY FACTS

  • Cerebral palsy (CP) - neither genetic nor a ‘condition’, it is understood that the vast majority of cases are congenital, coming at or about the time of birth, and/or are diagnosed at a very young age rather than during adolescence or adulthood.
  • Post-polio syndrome (PPRP) is a condition that affects approximately 25–50% of people who have previously contracted poliomyelitis (polio) after the initial infection. Symptoms include acute or increased muscular weakness, pain in the muscles, and fatigue.
  • Cerebral palsy (CP) treatment often requires long-term rehabilitation, including occupational therapy, physical therapy, orthotic braces, corrective shoes and, in some cases, orthopedic surgery. Management should focus on treatments that encourage strength but do not affect fatigue levels.
  • A third of India’s states have more poor people than 26 of the poorest African nations combined.


PROGRAM DATA

2003/2006

PARTNERSHIPS BEGAN

3,120

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

4,018

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 

Indonesia

 

OVERVIEW

Comprising approximately 17,508 islands and over 238 million people, Indonesia is the world’s fourth most populous country. 58% of the population lives on Java, the world’s most populous island. Despite having abundant natural resources, poverty remains widespread in Indonesia.

People with disabilities are sadly considered an embarrassment. A significant struggle faced by people with disabilities is the belief that their disabilities are a punishment from God for sin. In Java and Bali in particular, a person with a disability is believed to be possessed by a supernatural spirit which must be exorcised.

 

PARTNER 1

Yakkum Rehabilitation Center was started in 1982 by an inspirational and driven New Zealander, Colin McLennan. On a visit to Yogyakarta for a Boy Scout jamboree, he was distressed by the number of disabled and aimless children he saw roaming the streets.“The sight shocked him because he’d never seen anything like this in NZ. It really touched him and he became obsessed. He met another man of good heart, Pak Parjono, who was an amputee who’d been bitten by a snake.

He became Yakkum’s first client and staff member. They made a formidable team and together they started collecting kids and helping in their rehabilitation, first as an outpost of Bethesda Hospital.

From this small start Yakkum is now a major complex that has helped over 10,000 people build skills and live independently. Yakkum’s prosthetics factory turns out limbs and adapts bicycles and motorbikes to give people with disabilities mobility. It also has a small factory producing wooden toys and artwork. Nearly half of their workforce are persons with disabilities.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS:  Jln. Kaliurang Km 13,5 Besi, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

URL: www.yakkum-rehabilitation.org

EMAIL: support@yakkum-rehabilitation.org

DIRECTOR: Arshinta Shinta

 

PARTNER 2

PUSPADI Bali assists people with physical disabilities to access rehabilitation services so that they can establish their place in society as productive citizens. Established in 1999, PUSPADI Bali is a local NGO committed to improving the lives of people with physical disabilities throughout Bali and Eastern Indonesia, and strives towards an inclusive society in which people with disabilities are treated equally and provided with the same opportunities as others.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Annika Linden Centre, Jalan Bakung No19, Tohpati, Desa Kesiman Kertalangu,Denpasar Timur, Bali 80237, Indonesia

URL: www.puspadibali.org

EMAIL: info@puspadibali.org

DIRECTOR: I Nengah Latra

 

KEY FACTS

  • At 37%, physical disability is the most prevalent type of disability in Indonesia, followed by visual impairment at 13%.
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP) - neither genetic nor a ‘condition’, it is understood that the vast majority of cases are congenital, coming at or about the time of birth, and/or are diagnosed at a very young age rather than during adolescence or adulthood.

  • The gap in primary school attendance rates between disabled and non-disabled children ranges from 10% in India to 60% in Indonesia, and for secondary education, from 15% in Cambodia to 58% in Indonesia.

  • Two individuals of different religions may not marry, unless they convert so that they share a religion.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2011/2015

PARTNERSHIPS BEGAN

340

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

2,918

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Nepal

 

OVERVIEW

Landlocked in the Himalayas between India and China, Nepal is one of the poorest countries in the world with an estimated 44% of Nepalis living below the poverty line. Disease prevalence is higher in Nepal than any other South Asian country, especially in rural areas. Leading diseases and illnesses include gastrointestinal disorders, intestinal parasites, leprosy and tuberculosis. Malnutrition also remains considerably high causing 47% of children under the age of 5 to be stunted. Although there has been a declining trend of this rate over the past five years, malnutrition remains alarmingly high. In spite of these figures, some improvements in health care have been made, most notably in maternal-child health.

 

PARTNER

When Ganga Rayamajhi was 17 years old she was fitted with her first pair of prosthetic limbs, having lost both legs as a baby in a kitchen fire. In 2004, after having met a representative from a New Zealand based non-profit organization, Ganga’s passions were ignited. She decided to set up her own organization to help others like herself who had been neglected to uplift them physically and emotionally.

In 2006 the Hope Disability Centre ("HDC") or Asha Apanga Kendra (in Nepali) was born and formally registered in Nepal. With Ganga in the driver’s seat, Asha Apanga Kendra has grown significantly over the last eight years – increasing capacity of patients, scale of operations and overall effectiveness – supporting all disabled persons who request help.

HDC supports all disabled persons of Gulmi, and other districts of Nepal, with community-based projects and programs that improve mobility, health, education, human rights and legal counseling, skills training and employment. In doing so, they help disabled Nepalis live with dignity, self-worth, and independence with basic rights in the community.

“We believe that promoting self-help, rather than offering sympathy to our disabled members is the most effective way for a members rehabilitation and usefulness in a country that has had a long struggle with militancy, gender inequality, caste system, discrimination, human rights violations, political mismanagement and poverty.” – Ganga Rayamajhi

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Dhagithum-3, Tamghas, Gulmi, Nepal

URL: www.hopecentrenepal.org

EMAIL: ganga@hopecentrenepal.org

DIRECTOR: Ganga Rayamajhi

 

KEY FACTS

  • Approximately half of all people with clubfoot are affected in both feet (i.e., bilateral clubfoot). Clubfoot occurs in males twice as frequently as in females. Without treatment, people with clubfoot often appear to walk on their ankles or on the sides of their feet.

  • Poor families often feel obliged to send their children to work rather than to school, sustaining the cycle of poverty. About 1/4 of Nepali children are engaged in some kind of family or wage labour.

  • There is a large gap between women and men regarding their access to health care, nutrition, education and participation in decision-making. Infant mortality is much lower for males than females, and illiteracy is far more prevalent among girls than boys.

  • Hinduism is practiced by 80% of Nepalis, making it the country with the highest percentage of Hindu followers.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2009

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

364

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

2,020

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Pakistan

 

OVERVIEW

Decades of military rule, political and social instability and armed conflict with neighboring countries have left major deficiencies in Pakistan’s infrastructure, despite its current rapid economic development. This is especially true for families living in rural areas, where over 65% of the country’s disabled population resides.

 

PARTNER

Established in 1957, the Pakistan Society for the Rehabilitation of the Disabled (PSRD) is a non-profit, charitable organization in Lahore, Pakistan. Since its modest beginning – a two room physiotherapy center in a local hospital – PSRD has developed into a comprehensive rehabilitation center for people with physical disabilities, offering a wide range of affordable medical, surgical, educational and rehabilitation services, particularly for people from the low income sector.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: 111- Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan

URL: www.psrd.org.pk

EMAIL: psrd@brain.net.pk

DIRECTOR: Ghazala Hameed

 

KEY FACTS

  • On average, children from the poorest areas of Pakistan have to walk 4 kilometers to the nearest middle and secondary schools. It is estimated that around 1.4 million children in Pakistan do not have access to schools due to limited mobility and transportation issues.
  • For a child with an untreated limb disability, living in a society where disability is frowned upon and education is inaccessible, there are few places to turn. In need of the financial resources for treatment and being rejected by society, a common place for these children to turn is street begging.
  • Socially, in Pakistan disabilities are seen as a curse or a punishment and immediately give children with a limb disability a negative stigma. A child who is seen as a financial and emotional burden to their families is particularly vulnerable to abuse and neglect.
  • Limb disabilities far outweigh any other disability category in Pakistan. This, combined with the fact that 44% of disabled persons are under the age of 16, shows great need for orthopedic pediatric care in Pakistan.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2011

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

1,151

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

3,780

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Somaliland

 

OVERVIEW

The Republic of Somaliland is a sovereign state in the Horn of Africa sharing its borders with Republic of Djibouti, Federal Republic of Ethiopia and Somalia to the east. Since it's self-proclaimed independence in June 1960, it still however, remains unrecognised by any country or international organization.

 

PARTNER

Disability Action Network ("DAN"), founded in 2002, is a nonprofit organization created to support the needs of people with disabilities in Somaliland. This support is in terms of human rights education and mobility aid for social and economic inclusion.

People with disabilities in Somalia are often disregarded by their families because they are thought to be a terrible burden to the family and add stigma to the community. Therefore, it is up to local organizations to take care of them and teach society that people with disabilities have a right to live a prosperous life.

DAN is based in Hargeisa, North-West Somalia (Somaliland). The organization was founded by the management team of Hargeisa Rehabilitation Centre ("HRC") and other members consisting of People with Disabilities ("PWD"). It was created in the post-war context of the country to respond to the various needs of the PWD of our war-torn society and to help PWD help themselves.

Although DAN was only legally registered in 2002, it has provided services under the HRC since 1992.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Hargeisa, Somaliland - Opposite Hargeisa Group Hospital

URL: www.dansomaliland.org

EMAIL: info@dansomaliland.org

DIRECTOR: Ali Jama

 

PROGRAM DATA

2013

94

1,115

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED

 
 

Colombia

 

OVERVIEW

A middle power, Colombia is the third largest economy in South America and one of the oldest democracies in Latin America. However, it has endured over 40 years of armed conflict and widespread drug production and trafficking. It also ranks among the most unequal Latin American countries in terms of wealth distribution.

Dominated by informal jobs and a high rate of unemployment, there are few significant prospects for the creation of new work opportunities.

 

PARTNER

For over 30 years, Fundacion Casa de Colombia (FCDC) has been working tirelessly supporting the most vulnerable children from Colombia in areas of health, education and nutrition.

 

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS: Personería Juridica No. 1008, 6B Avenida Norte No. 25 AN 41, Cali, Colombia

URL: www.casadecolombia.org

EMAIL: fundacioncasadecolombia@gmail.com

DIRECTOR: Margarita Lenis

 

KEY FACTS

  • Colombia was the 100th country to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability.
  • Estimates show that there may as many as 80,000 unexploded, hidden land mines left in Colombia’s rural areas. In these places, most children must walk several miles to attend school, making them particularly vulnerable to land mine accidents.
  • In Colombia public service television is obliged to include closed captioning, sub-titles, or sign language.
  • The most deadly thing in Colombia is the Kokoi frog. One millionth of an ounce of its venom can kill a man.

 

PROGRAM DATA

2006

PARTNERSHIP BEGAN

546

TOTAL CHILDREN TREATED

737

TOTAL SERVICES PROVIDED